Worth Reading – 5 June, 2015 Week in Review

Optimized-DiversityTreeEach week we summarize the research announcements and publish the recap on Sunday. We also send out an email to those who subscribe with the most popular articles from the previous week.  (If you would like to receive these recaps, please sign up here.) This is distributed on Tuesdays. But if you aren’t on that list, then you won’t know.

Please let me know, if a weekly summary of the best on the web is something that would be of interest to you. If the response is positive, we will continue.  Better still, sign up for the email to be sent out on Fridays AND be sure to Like, Tweet and Share using the TABs to your far left on the page.

 

If you only have time to read one story from Autism Daily Newscast this week then it should be this by regular contributor Emma Dalmayne

Âû a history and current day phenomenon – neurodiveristy and autism

If you are anything like me you may have been wondering why some autists have been adding Âû to their name so I was anxious (in the good sense) to find out more and the history behind it. I am embarrassed to say, I didn’t even know that there was a “formal” Âutistic Ûnion. If you are part of either the Autism Community or Autistic Community this is a must read.

~~~~~~~~~~~

At Autism Daily Newscast we come across some wonderful pieces that have been written. If possible, we request reprints. Otherwise we share them on our Facebook Timeline, through Twitter and Scoop.it. Even though you won’t see them here on the Newscast in full, we would like to share them with you.

Here are three articles that we had wished we had the resources to write … but we are glad someone has.

10 Tips to Help Young Adults With Autism Transition into The Workforce by Linda Mastroianni  Founder, SpeakingAutism.ca in HuffingtonPost

For many young adults, the transition from school to employment is often a frightening and intimidating one. Leaving the familiarity of routine behind and beginning a new journey into the unknown is difficult for anyone. For young adults with autism, this experience can be even more terrifying. They face many different challenges than that of their neuro-typical peers. Entering into the workforce is a milestone in one’s life; a rite of passage that is often identified as the beginning of their journey into adulthood. But for so many young adults with autism, this transition can be the most difficult and stressful time in their lives.

Our Recommendation: Well I love everything Linda writes and am very glad to consider her a friend and a contributor to Autism Daily Newscast. She is a great writer who keeps it simple. Her tips are a quick and useful checklist to consider on this very important issue many of us parents are facing.

My son has autism. That’s why I won’t be finishing Norman Doidge’s book by Benison O’Reilly in the Guardian  I’d love there to be a miracle cure for my son’s autism. Unfortunately, there is no evidence for sound therapy beyond a few well-publicised anecdotes

“I’m a medical writer, autism mother and author. It’s almost a fulltime job counteracting the misinformation that surrounds autism, its causes and treatments. Autism parents are vulnerable to the promise of miracles cures and there’s no shortage of charlatans to prey on these vulnerabilities.”

Our Recommendation: I have a great deal of respect for Benison’s writing. She provides the technical rigour often missing in any analysis and demands evidence based data. The fact that I can understand her is an added bonus. This is far more than a book critique; it calls into question all individuals or organisations that selectively choose some facts and omit others to support there message.

Speaking Out Against Autism Speaks, Even if It Means No Ice Cream By David M. Perry in the New York Times

“I was faced with a dilemma. I am not a fan of Autism Speaks, but I didn’t know how hard to push my values. . .

“Autism Speaks is a charity which describes itself as dedicated to helping people who “struggle” with autism, funding research into “prevention, treatments and a possible cure.” They have been criticized for their mission, their rhetoric, the makeup of their leadership, and the way they use their funds. To me, the most important criticisms come from autistic individuals, who see the charity as “eliminationist” – seeking to eliminate autistic people. The Autistic Self-Advocacy Network has adopted the motto “nothing about us without us,” in part to criticize the lack of autistic leadership in Autism Speaks. Some autistic bloggers condemn the “light it up blue” campaign for “autism awareness” that takes place every April, because they want acceptance, not awareness. I am unable to find an answer from Autism Speaks to those criticisms; when invited to comment for this piece and given ample time to do so, they did not respond.”

Our Recommendation: Perry’s experience with trying to get a response from Autism Speaks only confirms what I wrote about in my post “Autism Speaks is smart, very smart”

Why do Suzanne and Bob Wright continue to adopt a stance of silence on the critical issues? The answer is simple. It works!  

To date there is often very little criticism in the mainstream media around Autism Speaks. It is time to stop Autism Speaks from NOT being accountable to answering our questions. This article may just do it. This is not so much a condemnation of Autism Speaks but a personal story of one man’s dilemma of living up to his conscience as well as balancing the needs of his child.  Byrespect for others, Perry handles the situation with grace and consideration.