August 13, 2016

Vaccination KeystrokeEven when anti-vaxxers fund studies, they get the same results: Their hypothesis that vaccines cause autism has nothing to stand on.

In a study that included approximately 95,000 children with older siblings, receipt of the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine was not associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), regardless of whether older siblings had ASD, findings that indicate no harmful association between receipt of MMR vaccine and ASD even among children already at higher risk for ASD, according to a study in the April 21 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on child health.

While every major health organization, researcher, and certified physician can agree that vaccines don’t cause autism, the anti-vaxxers out there remain stalwart that somehow, the link must still exist, and it’s simply due to incorrect data that it hasn’t been proven yet.

This is despite a substantial body of research over the last 15 years that has found no link between the MMR vaccine and ASD, parents and others continue to associate the vaccine with ASD. Now, it appears that the efforts of a certain group of anti-vaxxers have backfired.

 

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