Could Google Glass benefit those on the Autism spectrum?

CC BY-NC-ND by Ted Eytan

CC BY-NC-ND by Ted Eytan

The wearable computer with an optical head-mounted display, known as Google Glass, is currently being researched and developed by Google X. This new technology can be described as a hands-free smartphone that has the ability to work with the internet via voice commands. The only available version of Google Glass at the moment is the Explorer Edition, which is available to testers and Google Input/Output developers in the United States for $1,500.

At the moment, Google Glass currently utilizes eye-tracking technology, voice commands, and finger gestures. These aspects, however, are not too autism friendly, as quite a few individuals with autism have trouble with eye contact, speaking, and motor controls. This means that for some, Google Glass would not be a good idea. For others, however, it could work miracles.

Google Glass could potentially end up being able to quickly record videos to show to the parents and caretakers of an autistic individual in therapy, such as a miraculous moment or a live stream of whole therapy session to see what is going on. Google Glass could easily then e-mail or text the footage to the caretaker with voice commands. It’s even possible this device could make accurate measurements without interruptions, such as measuring one’s body movements.

Another very interesting possibility is the concept of an autistic individual watching an instructor engage in social skills in a grocery store or school for example. Then the student could go into a social situation while the instructor watches and provides feedback/advice in real-time.

The possibilities are endless and could have a profound effect on not only the autistic community, but the entire healthcare community.

Creative-Commons-Lizenz CC-BY Martin Missfeldt

Creative-Commons-Lizenz CC-BY Martin Missfeldt