Using antidepressants Does not increase autism risk

pregnancyNew research published in the Journal of Clinical epidemiology has proved there is little or no correlation from taking SSRI anti depressant medications during pregnancy and having a child with autism.

Previous research has shown that the risk can be up to five times greater when a mother is prescribed anti depressants during gestation.

Research was conducted at Aarhus University and staff specialist at Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark. They looked at more than 600,000 Danish children born between 1996 and 2006, making it the largest study of its kind.

The study showed that there was a 2 pc chance of a child developing autism to a mother who was taking anti depressants whilst pregnant, compared to a 1.5 pc chance to a mother who wasn’t. The study also took into account parental and sibling diagnosis, and proved the risk was minimal.

Lead researcher Jakob Christensen said:

“We know from previous studies that there is an increased risk for autism, among other things, if the parents have a mental diagnosis such as depression. But we cannot demonstrate that the risk is further increased if the mother has received prescription antidepressant medication during the pregnancy. By analysing data for siblings we can see that the risk of having a child with autism is largely the same regardless of whether the mother takes antidepressant medication or not during the pregnancy. data for siblings we can see that the risk of having a child with autism is largely the same regardless of whether the mother takes antidepressant medication or not during the pregnancy.”

The researchers stress that there may be other risks associated with taking antidepressant medication during pregnancy.Women who are planning a pregnancy are advised to discuss options with their GP before becoming pregnant.

 

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Shân Ellis About Shân Ellis

Shân Ellis, is a qualified journalist with five years experience of writing features, blogging and working on a regional newspaper. Prior to working as a journalist, she was a ghost writer for top publishers and was closely involved in the editing and development of book series. Shân has a degree in the sciences, and 5 A levels. She lives in the UK and is the mother of an autistic child.